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WEST MIDLANDS POLICE GREAT WAR MEMORIAL SITE

 

 

LEO WAKEMAN

CHARLES WALKER

JOSEPH WALKER

THOMAS WALL

EDMUND WALLACE

THOMAS WALSH

ERNEST WALTERS

WILLIAM THOMAS WALTERS

ALEX WARNER

RICHARD FREDERICK WARNER

JAMES WARRINER

FRED ALVA WATSON                                                                                                                                                                FULL REPORT
RWF cap badge
Fred Watson was born in the spring of 1894 in Bilton, Rugby.  His father was called Alva Fred Watson, a plumber, his mother was Lilian Watson born in Rugby. He had 5 younger sisters, Lilian Ellen (1895), Minnie (1897), Catherine (1900) and Gladys (1902).  In 1901 the family were living at 43 Union Street, Rugby but by 1911 they were sharing two rooms at 38 Bye Street, Ledbury. 
Fred joined Birmingham City Police 21st September 1914, as a 20 year old carter and moved to Witton. He served on the ‘A’ Division with Warrant number 8540.  He resigned on 15th November 1915, to enlist in the army, being assigned to the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. 
Fred went to France on 14th June 1916, two weeks before the Battle of Somme. His battalion occupied trenches on the eastern edge of Dellville Wood during the night of Saturday 2nd September. Fred's battalion attacked the German lines at midday alongside the 20th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, who entered the southern portion of Ginchy. Fred and his battalion wereenfiladed by fire from Ale Alley and were halted in their advance. An attempt was then made to take Hop Alley and Beer Trench across open ground, with men occupying shell holes about 40 yards south of Hop Alley. A further attack was made on the southern portion of Beer trench, parts of the trench system being successfully captured. Elements of the battalion managed to enter the northern part of Ginchy but were never heard of again. The following day the survivors were withdrawn to Becordel-Becourt. Casualties in the attack amounted to 1 officer and 82 men killed.  Fred's body was buried by men from the Coldstream Guards on 18th September, once the line had moved forward, and now rests in Delville Wood Cemetery.

TOM WOODWARD WATSON

JOHN WILLIAM WATTS

ERNEST AMOS WEBB

HORACE WEEDON                                                                                                                                                               xFULL REPORT
Horace Weedon
Horace Weedon was born in St Pauls, Luton circa 1892 to Jethro (John) and Sarah Ann Weedon (Nee Whitmore) who were living at 53, Wimbourne Road, Luton.  By 1901 his father was a general labourer, while his wife was a straw hat sewer, living at 15 Foundry Lane, Luton.  Horace had four sisters:  Florence (1886), Henrietta (1887), who were both also straw hat finishers, Kate (1889), and Daisy (1891), and six brothers: Jack (1894), George (1896), Fred (1901), Frank (1903) who died aged 12 of diphtheria, Albert (1904) and Sidney (1907).  At the age of 18 Horace joined the Army, serving three years with the Grenadier Guards before leaving and, in November 1913, joining Birmingham City Police. Horace served at Ladywood Police Station but nine months later, on 4th August 1914, he was recalled to Blenheim Barracks, Aldershot alongside his colleague from B Division, Horace Weedon.  Horace becoming Private 14903 and Walter, Private 14909.  Their battalion is immediately drafted to France aboard the SS Cawdor Castle, arriving at Le Havre on 13th August 1914.  The battalion were in reserve at Mons, falling back with the BEF until they reached the Aisne.
On 14th September, Walter and Horace’s battalion crossed the Aisne at Pont Arcy and advanced under shellfire to La Cour de Soupir Farm which they reached at 1030am.  The Germans immediately attacked the the battalion’s positions but were repulsed.  Heavy fighting continued throughout the remainder of the day with the battalion successfully defending the positions but at a cost of 500 men killed, missing or wounded.   The following day the battalion dug defensive trenches and held the positions although continually attacked and shelled by the Germans until relieved on 17th September 1914.   In the maelstrom of the battle, both Horace and Walter are killed and their bodies lost.  A newspaper article quotes Walter's father saying Walter had been captured, but alas this does not appear to have been the case.  Horace and Walter are both recorded as killed on 16th September 1914 and are commemorated on the La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial, Seine-et-Marne.

TOM WELCH

FREDERICK WELLS

WALTER WYCLIFFE WELLS

WILLIAM WELSHMAN

ALFRED WESTBURY

ALBERT WESTON

ALFRED WHITE

JOHN THOMAS WHITE

JAMES WHITEHOUSE

JOHN WHITNEY

JAMES WICKSON

WALTER F CHARLES WIGGINS

JAMES HENRY WILDING

EDMUND WILLIAMS

JOHN WILLIAMS

FRANK WILLIAMS

HERBERT EDWARD WILLIAMS

RICHARD OWEN WILLIAMS

FREDERICK THOMAS WILSON

JOHN WINSTANLEY

WILLIAM TURNER WISE

WILLIAM WOMWELL

ALBERT WOOD

THOMAS WOOD

WILLIAM WOOD

JAMES FRANCIS WOODFORD

JOSEPH W WOODHOUSE

WILLIAM HENRY WOODWARD

WILLIAM HENRY WOOLLEY

WILLIAM PATRICK WRENN

GEORGE ARTHUR WRIGHT

GILBERT WRIGHT

REGINALD WRIGHT

ALFRED JOSEPH (JAMES?) WRIGHT

WILLIAM WRIGHT

HORACE EDMUND KIRBY WYATT